Dog Trot, Faulkner and College Hill

There have been a couple of fires in the last week or so to historic buildings — one in Ashville, Alabama to the circa 1820, two-story (sooooo uncommon to see a two-story in this style) dog trot, called the Looney House.  It’s been on the National Register since 1974. The home, which was tended to by a county historical society, had previouly been open as a museum. It has half-dovetail corners pegged with dowels and Flemish-bond brick chimneys, and at one point the home was covered in some sort of siding.  Floors are heart pine.

Ashville, Alabama

From the historic marker:
John Looney and his son, Henry, served in General Andrew Jackson’s volunteer company which built Fort Strother on the Coosa River and later fought at Horseshoe Bend in 1814. Looney’s family of nine moved from Maury Co. Tenn. To homestead 1817 in St. Clair County. Land patent granted in 1822. The two story log house with double dog-trot is a rare example of pioneer architecture in Alabama.

These images are from a visit in 2011:

Ashville, Alabama

Ashville, Alabama

Donations for repair to the St Clair Historical Society, and they’re selling a special t-shirt as part of the campaign.


The other fire was in Lafayette County, Mississippi, at the 1844 College Hill Presbyterian Church, the church where William Faulkner married Estelle in 1929. Just a quick note since I’m a bit of a Faulknerphile ( #funfact, Merle Haggard was a fan): since they were both married, the wedding likely happened on the front porch of the church parsonage since they were both divorced. Only the minister’s wife and Estelle’s sister were witnesses to the event.

I don’t have an image of the church, but their website is showing drone footage of the damage.

Evolution of the Townley Rest Area

Quite possibly the most famous rest area in all of Alabama; people love to have their pictures taken here in Townley.

2009:

Townley Rest Area, Townley AL

By 2018, many additions:

World Famous Townley Rest Area, Townley AL

including a privacy partition:

World Famous Townley Rest Area, Townley AL

Welcome you’ll! 

2022, nature is threatening to take over:

World Famous Townley Rest Area

World Famous Townley Rest Area

Coop DeVille

A little more about this later, but I’ve promised pics of our chicken coop for a while now — this is the run being built, where the girls spend most of their day when they’re not sleeping or laying. We have a (metal) screen door at the end so it’s easy for us to enter. The slope of the tin roof keeps water away

Our Chicken Coop

It’s surrounded by concrete patio stones so predators can’t dig underneath to get in.

Their “house” is a play-pretend house like one would have in a backyard. We outfitted it with nests for egg-laying and dowels running the length for them to sleep on.

Our Chicken Coop

et viola! This was built in 2014 and has done so, so, so well. This year, we reinforced the bottom of the playhouse with plywood for protection against coyotes and raccoons, which we have since there are woods behind our home.

Our Chicken Coop

This is the late, great Nelle Harper Lee, who I named because she really did enjoy her privacy. She was an Americauna and layed beautiful blue/green eggs.

Nelle Harper Lee

Her sisters are Tallulah and Zelda, who are 8 years old now, old for a bantam hen (their life expectancy is 4-8 years). Many sources will discuss how bantams only lay for 2-3 years, but our girls layed for over six years. Even now, Zelda will lay the occasional egg! I know it’s her because everyone else either lays brown, peach, or blue/green eggs, and hers are beautiful white and more oblong.

We use sand as the floor media as it dries so quickly and we almost never have to do anything to it. No smell. It’s great. Any questions, just email me!

Atlanta Origami

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

We had a fun time at our visit to the Atlanta Botanical Garden — they’re hosting Origami in the Garden, an exhibit of 18 installations of ~70 sculptures. I was glad we were able to use our reciprocal priveliges (we’re members at the Huntsville Botanical Garden) as tickets for entry at Atlanta are almost $25pp on weekdays.  Our family membership in H’ville costs $125/year so it’s easy for us to have the membership pay for itself multiple times over the course of a year.

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

If you’re interested in membership at a botanical garden, the reciprocals are through the American Horticultural Society, with relationships at 345+ gardens in the US and Canada.

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

The gardens here were established in the 1970s and are on 30+ acres.

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

It’s really a lovely site, and was terrific to see an outdoor demo kitchen in their edible garden area.

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

My favorite area was the greenhouse featuring all kinds of orchids

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA

Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta GA