Grill, Boxes, Lists, Notes, and a Graveshelter at Darian Primitive Baptist

Some really nice, interesting monuments at Darian Primitive Baptist Church in Tallapoosa County, Alabama:

Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

Hodnett Family genealogy

Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

Bishop Family genealogy from late 1700s, with monument erected by descendants in 2009
Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

 

“In memory of Abner L Stanfield, was born March the 7, 1826, died January the 9, 1893: “I hope to meet my dear one in that bright world a bove and dwell with him in that sweet home where parting is no more”

Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

Wooden graveshelter with metal roof grave shelter
Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

 

Several box grave monuments
Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

 

Unknown as of 1998
Darian Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Tallapoosa County, AL

Folk Cemeteries of South Alabama, Some Including Graveshelters

In the Jackson, Alabama area, we found this swept cemetery with a graveshelter at Pleasant Grove Baptist:

Here, curbing with gravel:

Other graves have mounding, and if you look closely, due to rain…

The surface gets these odd little rises where the pebbles/shell bits are:

The graveshelter here is for Pugh Perdue Rotch, who lived from 3/21/1919 to 7/11/1922

Newville, Alabama had this Baptist Church cemetery pretty much in the middle of town, and it was also a swept cemetery (grass is not allowed to grow; the sand is swept to keep anything from growing). The oldest known grave here is from 1891, and a historic marker notes that in 1947, burial spaces were sold for $.25/sqft.

The graveshelter at Ramah Primitive Baptist in Houston County, Alabama is no longer extant, but the cemetery has many folk elements in that many of the family plots have the gravel and curbing:

and these ‘head and shoulders’ wooden markers, 

This is where the graveshelter was at one time. It’s for (can’t quite be certain) Maggie or Margie Whitehead, daughter of JNO. & Nancy Whitehead, born Aug 5, 1889, died Nov 4, 1890 ‘gone but not forgotten’ — and features this line of shells to make a cross:

Mosley Cemetery in Choctaw County, Alabama has this tabernacle just outside the gates:

Inside the cemetery, a graveshelter for Jasper C. Carlisle, who served in the CSA, Company F, 54th Alabama Infantry and lived 3/9/1842 – 8/27/1916

“No Rain On Mary Jane” Graveshelter, And She Was Number One

Driving up to the Whitesboro Cemetery in Etowah County, the little paved path by the church was blocked by a pickup truck. I parked behind, and as a gentleman and another person were standing in front of another grave, I nodded as I walked by quietly to give them their privacy.

I was going further back, to document the grave shelter for the Jacobs family, James J. (1865-1939) and Mary Jane (1869-1934). Under their names, ‘Having finished life’s duty, they now sweetly rest’ is engraved.

Above, a wooden carport-style graveshelter decorated with zigzag wood edging and in front, a painted wooden monogram cutout that suggests this graveshelter is still being maintained by family currently.


Especially striking is what is handwritten inside the shelter — a family tree with 70+ names, one entry noting that Wilmer was KIA in 1944 in France, another note that there would be ‘no rain on Mary Jane‘ (thus, this graveshelter), and at the bottom, ‘for other descendants & (kin) just look around‘.

Walking back to my car, I waved goodbye to the people who were standing at the grave, still wishing to give them their space. They waved back, and I walked nearer, judging if they would be willing to talk a little. About thirty minutes later, we were still there talking about graveshelters, homemade monuments, and other folk practices.

The gentleman told me about one other cemetery closer to Attalla, the one at Noble Hill Missionary Baptist, that he thought either used to, or may still have a graveshelter, so after a while, I left to check on it. There wasn’t a graveshelter, but I did find this:

#1 Wife, Mother, and Grandmother

Graveshelters Froooommmm Spaaaaace, Another, And Curious Designs

I’ve been documenting graveshelters for a few years now, and there have been ones you literally can’t get to from here (private roads), others that were functional apiaries, some that have obviously been homes to other kinds of wildlife, and this one was — well, another you can’t get to from here, actually. It was gated off because the area around it serves as a cow pasture.
Graveshelters at Peck Cemetery, Falkville AL -- has two graveshelters behind fence//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

It’s Peck Cemetery in Falkville, Alabama. I got the directions from FindAGrave (where there’s another pic of the grave shelters) so I could drive out this past winter. I did manage to get the phone number for the landowner, so I’ll call him sometime soon to ask for permission to go right up to it, but thanks to satellites…under that nice big tree, you can see — and a little tiny bit in the pic above — two nice graveshelters for a married couple:

John (the wonderful person who did the FindAGrave entry even included the local paper mention for them both: “He was the leading citizen of his vicinity in the respective walks of life.”) and Elizabeth Brown (“She has been a consistent member of the Methodist Church for eight years. She died leaving every evidence that her future was safe.”), who died in 1889 and 1890.


The other one I visited the same month was at Prudes Creek Cemetery in Adger, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. It’s for Martha and W.R. Gwin (and there are a *lot* of Gwins in this cemetery).
Graveshelter at Prudes Creek Cemetery, Adger AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Martha A. Gwin, March 14, 1852 – December 1932
W. R. Gwin, March 12, 1848 – November 10, 1946
Graveshelter at Prudes Creek Cemetery, Adger AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Graveshelter at Prudes Creek Cemetery, Adger AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

This is a great cemetery. There’s a man nicknamed “Litebread” with a son nicknamed “Cornbread“. And behind this grave shelter, there’s this curious, wonderful design on a monument for Earley H. Gwin, who was born in 1899 and died in 1917:

Monument With Nice Scene, Earley H. Gwin, Prudes Creek Baptist Church Cemetery//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Monument With Nice Scene, Earley H. Gwin, Prudes Creek Baptist Church Cemetery//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Monument With Nice Scene, Earley H. Gwin, Prudes Creek Baptist Church Cemetery//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Graveshelters At Sivley Cemetery, Dancy’s Chapel, And Ballinger Cemetery In North Alabama

I visited another large graveshelter, this one in the Sivley Cemetery in Lawrence County, Alabama, and it covers five graves including one for a baby.

Sivley Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Graveshelter, Sivley Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

This graveshelter is more of a carport style, with the metal roofing, and has chain link surrounding.
Graveshelter, Sivley Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Bricks are used for curbing — those are just regular house bricks painted white — and artificial turf carpeting covers each grave. Other areas are covered with pea gravel.
Graveshelter, Sivley Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Though on this side, the wife’s section has no curbing or cover other than the gravel.
Graveshelter, Sivley Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The cemetery’s sign notes that it’s a community cemetery, but that one of the committee members (there are four listed, with phone numbers for three) must give approval before any grave is dug or disturbed, and approval must also be given before a monument is placed.


Also in Lawrence County is Dancy’s Chapel, which also has elements of a more traditional Upland South cemetery — coping/curbing around the graves, many topped with sand or gravel.
Dancy's Chapel Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Dancy's Chapel Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Dancy's Chapel Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The grave shelter here is constructed of brick and was likely built in the late 1940’s as the burials for the Morgans here are 1947 and 1975.
Graveshelter, Dancy's Chapel Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Graveshelter, Dancy's Chapel Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Deer and raccoon tracks here.
Graveshelter, Dancy's Chapel Cemetery, Lawrence County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js


At Ballinger Cemetery in rural Morgan County, Alabama, there is another small graveshelter for Eliza Marie Ballinger, “Infant Child 1908”
Ballinger Cemetery, Morgan County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Graveshelter, Ballinger Cemetery, Morgan County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Graveshelter, Ballinger Cemetery, Morgan County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

For the gentleman on this monument, it reads:
‘Field and farm, creek and wood, Sunday church, and love of home’
Ballinger Cemetery, Morgan County AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

This one reads ‘Memories of you dear brother, give us roses in the winter.’

She Loathed Being Wet

We found another graveshelter in Sevier County, Tennessee — in Pollard Cemetery, established from land Dr. Feuquay Pollard donated from his farm to serve the purpose.


“Doctor Feuquay Pollard had this little house built to cover his wife’s grave because she (Elizabeth. A. Cate) loathed being wet. Doctor kept her grave covered and dry until this house could be built.”

Inside:

Doctor F. Pollard, born February 9, 1826 — died June 12, 1897
Elizabeth A. Pollard, born January 26, 1835 — died July 14, 1892

Pollard Graveshelter, Pollard Cemetery, Sevier County TN//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Graveshelters: Pilgrim’s Rest Church Cemetery, Baker FL

This is the other cemetery with graveshelters we found, not too far from the one at the Wing Missionary Baptist cemetery in Wing, Alabama. This is Pilgrim’s Rest Church cemetery in Baker, Florida:

Many, but not all, monuments here done in the traditional manner with curbing and a pebble/gravel covering
Pilgrim's Rest Cemetery, Baker FL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Pilgrim's Rest Cemetery, Baker FL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

This set included shells, also traditional
Pilgrim's Rest Cemetery, Baker FL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Two separate graveshelters, side-by-side
Graveshelter, Pilgrim's Rest Cemetery, Baker FL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Peter Griffith, Jan 7, 1843 – Oct 19, 1935 (these are hard to read, so I may be off a bit)
Jane Griffith, Aug 27, 1842 – Jan 27, 1898
Graveshelter, Pilgrim's Rest Cemetery, Baker FL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In the smaller, separate grave shelter:
Florence Griffith, daughter of Peter and Jane Griffith, April 28, 1878 – Aug 16, 1896


My mostly-updated Google Map for grave shelters can be found here. Please share with me if you know of any graveshelters not included in my map. Thank you!

Graveshelter: Wing, Alabama

I’ve been working on documenting graveshelters for a few years now and in September found two cemeteries with them that were previously unlisted.

Today, Wing Missionary Baptist Church in Wing, Alabama, which is very close to the Florida state line. Dinner on the ground tables:
Wing Missionary Baptist Church, Wing AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Wing Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery, Wing AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Overall very well maintained, and the most recent carrying on tradition, being swept (here with pebble/gravel), and traditional curbing.
Wing Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery, Wing AL

Inscribed on the curbing here is Psalm 23:5. “Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies…”
Wing Missionary Baptist Church, Wing AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Fiddle, Ford truck motif
Wing Missionary Baptist Church, Wing AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Wing Missionary Baptist Church, Wing AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Wing Missionary Baptist Church, Wing AL

Logging motif
Wing Missionary Baptist Church, Wing AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

One graveshelter

Some of this has aged badly, but I believe it reads:
In Memory of
Emma Lee Stokes
Daughter of John and Catharine Stokes
Born October 18, 1879 and Died from
Rattle Snake Bite Sept 26, 1890 Age 11
Years 11 Months and 17 Days

Graveshelter, Wing Missionary Baptist Church, Wing AL//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js


My mostly-updated Google Map for grave shelters can be found here. Please share with me if you know of any graveshelters not included in my map. Thank you!